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add some man pages

master
Felix von Leitner 19 years ago
parent
commit
10f26fd5bc
  1. 12
      Makefile
  2. 15
      buffer.h
  3. 37
      buffer/buffer.3
  4. 14
      buffer/buffer_feed.3
  5. 27
      buffer/buffer_flush.3
  6. 26
      buffer/buffer_get.3
  7. 27
      buffer/buffer_get_token.3
  8. 11
      buffer/buffer_getc.3
  9. 22
      buffer/buffer_getn.3
  10. 45
      buffer/buffer_init.3
  11. 23
      buffer/buffer_peek.3
  12. 19
      buffer/buffer_put.3
  13. 13
      buffer/buffer_put8long.3
  14. 16
      buffer/buffer_putalign.3
  15. 13
      buffer/buffer_putflush.3
  16. 13
      buffer/buffer_putlong.3
  17. 12
      buffer/buffer_putnlflush.3
  18. 17
      buffer/buffer_puts.3
  19. 12
      buffer/buffer_putsalign.3
  20. 12
      buffer/buffer_putsflush.3
  21. 11
      buffer/buffer_putspace.3
  22. 13
      buffer/buffer_putulong.3
  23. 13
      buffer/buffer_putxlong.3
  24. 12
      buffer/buffer_seek.3
  25. 7
      buffer/buffer_seek.c
  26. 3
      fmt/fmt_strn.3
  27. 3
      fmt/fmt_uint0.3
  28. 3
      fmt/fmt_ulong0.3
  29. 13
      scan/scan_8short.3
  30. 13
      scan/scan_ushort.3
  31. 17
      scan/scan_xshort.3

12
Makefile

@ -122,32 +122,32 @@ rename:
haveip6.h: tryip6.c
-rm -f $@
if $(DIET) $(CC) -c tryip6.c >/dev/null 2>&1; then echo "#define LIBC_HAS_IP6"; fi > $@
if $(DIET) $(CC) $(CFLAGS) -c tryip6.c >/dev/null 2>&1; then echo "#define LIBC_HAS_IP6"; fi > $@
-rm -f tryip6.o
haven2i.h: tryn2i.c
-rm -f $@
if $(DIET) $(CC) -o t tryn2i.c >/dev/null 2>&1; then echo "#define HAVE_N2I"; fi > $@
if $(DIET) $(CC) $(CFLAGS) -o t tryn2i.c >/dev/null 2>&1; then echo "#define HAVE_N2I"; fi > $@
-rm -f t
havesl.h: trysl.c
-rm -f $@
if ! $(DIET) $(CC) -o t trysl.c >/dev/null 2>&1; then echo "typedef int socklen_t;"; fi > $@
if ! $(DIET) $(CC) $(CFLAGS) -o t trysl.c >/dev/null 2>&1; then echo "typedef int socklen_t;"; fi > $@
-rm -f t
haveinline.h: tryinline.c
-rm -f $@
if ! $(DIET) $(CC) -c tryinline.c >/dev/null 2>&1; then echo "#define inline"; fi > $@
if ! $(DIET) $(CC) $(CFLAGS) -c tryinline.c >/dev/null 2>&1; then echo "#define inline"; fi > $@
-rm -f tryinline.o
iopause.h: iopause.h1 iopause.h2 trypoll.c
-rm -f $@
if $(DIET) $(CC) -o t trypoll.c >/dev/null 2>&1; then cp iopause.h2 iopause.h; else cp iopause.h1 iopause.h; fi
if $(DIET) $(CC) $(CFLAGS) -o t trypoll.c >/dev/null 2>&1; then cp iopause.h2 iopause.h; else cp iopause.h1 iopause.h; fi
-rm -f t
select.h: select.h1 select.h2 trysysel.c
-rm -f $@
if $(DIET) $(CC) -c trysysel.c >/dev/null 2>&1; then cp select.h2 select.h; else cp select.h1 select.h; fi
if $(DIET) $(CC) $(CFLAGS) -c trysysel.c >/dev/null 2>&1; then cp select.h2 select.h; else cp select.h1 select.h; fi
-rm -f trysysel.o

15
buffer.h

@ -2,12 +2,12 @@
#define BUFFER_H
typedef struct buffer {
char *x;
unsigned int p;
unsigned int n;
unsigned int a;
int fd;
int (*op)();
char *x; /* actual buffer space */
unsigned int p; /* current position */
unsigned int n; /* current size of string in buffer */
unsigned int a; /* allocated buffer size */
int fd; /* passed as first argument to op */
int (*op)(); /* use read(2) or write(2) */
} buffer;
#define BUFFER_INIT(op,fd,buf,len) { (buf), 0, 0, (len), (fd), (op) }
@ -15,7 +15,7 @@ typedef struct buffer {
#define BUFFER_INSIZE 8192
#define BUFFER_OUTSIZE 8192
extern void buffer_init(buffer* b,int (*op)(),int fd,char* y,unsigned int ylen);
extern void buffer_init(buffer* b,int (*op)(int,char*,unsigned int),int fd,char* y,unsigned int ylen);
extern int buffer_flush(buffer* b);
extern int buffer_put(buffer* b,const char* x,unsigned int len);
@ -35,7 +35,6 @@ extern int buffer_putnlflush(buffer* b); /* put \n and flush */
)
extern int buffer_get(buffer* b,char* x,unsigned int len);
extern int buffer_bget(buffer* b,char* x,unsigned int len);
extern int buffer_feed(buffer* b);
extern int buffer_getc(buffer* b,char* x);
extern int buffer_getn(buffer* b,char* x,unsigned int len);

37
buffer/buffer.3

@ -0,0 +1,37 @@
.TH buffer 3
.SH NAME
buffer.h \- generic read/write buffering
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
buffer* buffer_0; /* like stdio's stdin */
buffer* buffer_1; /* like stdio's stdout */
buffer* buffer_2; /* like stdio's stderr */
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer.h provides a generic buffer interface that can be used for
read and write buffering. Buffers must be initialized with
\fBbuffer_init\fR.
A buffer can only be used for reading or writing at the same time, not
both.
Unlike stdio, these write buffers are not flushed automatically at
program termination; you must manually call \fBbuffer_flush\fR,
\fBbuffer_putsflush\fR, \fBbuffer_putflush\fR or
\fBbuffer_putnlflush\fR.
.SH EXAMPLE
See buffer_init(3) for example read buffer code. Here is typical code
for printing an error message on stderr:
#include <buffer.h>
buffer_puts(buffer_2,"error: got only ");
buffer_putulong(buffer_2,got);
buffer_puts(buffer_2," bytes, but expected at least ");
buffer_putulong(buffer_2,expected);
buffer_putsflush(buffer_2," bytes!");
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_init(3), buffer_put(3), buffer_get(3), buffer_flush(3)

14
buffer/buffer_feed.3

@ -0,0 +1,14 @@
.TH buffer_feed 3
.SH NAME
buffer_feed \- low-level component of buffer_get
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_feed\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
If the string is nonempty, buffer_feed returns the length of the string.
If the string is empty, buffer_feed uses the read operation to feed data
into the string; it then returns the new length of the string, or 0 for
end of input, or -1 for error.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_init(3), buffer_get(3), buffer_peek(3), buffer_feed(3), buffer(3)

27
buffer/buffer_flush.3

@ -0,0 +1,27 @@
.TH buffer_flush 3
.SH NAME
buffer_flush \- feed buffer to write function
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_flush\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_flush feeds a string \fId\fR[0], \fId\fR[1], ...,
\fId\fR[\fIdlen\fR-1] to the write operation by calling
\fBop\fR(\fIfd\fR,\fId\fR,\fIdlen\fR)
If \fBop\fR successfully handles one or more bytes at the beginning of
the string, it must return the number of bytes handled; if this number
is smaller than \fIdlen\fR, buffer_flush will call \fBop\fR again with
the rest of the string. If \fBop\fR does not handle any bytes, and does
not encounter an error, it must return 0, or return -1 with \fIerrno\fR
set to EINTR; in either case, buffer_flush will immediately call \fBop\fR
again. If \fBop\fR encounters an error, it must return -1 with errno set to
something other than EINTR; buffer_flush will pass the error to the
caller.
On success, buffer_flush returns 0. On error, buffer_flush returns -1,
setting \fIerrno\fR appropriately.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_init(3)

26
buffer/buffer_get.3

@ -0,0 +1,26 @@
.TH buffer_get 3
.SH NAME
buffer_get \- read binary data from buffer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_get\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR,char* \fIx\fR,unsigned int \fIlen\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
Normally buffer_get copies data to \fIx\fR[0], \fIx\fR[1], ...,
\fIx\fR[\fIlen\fR-1] from the beginning of a string stored in
preallocated space; removes these \fIlen\fR bytes from the string; and
returns \fIlen\fR.
If, however, the string has fewer than \fIlen\fR (but more than 0)
bytes, buffer_get copies only that many bytes, and returns that number.
If the string is empty, buffer_get first uses a \fBread operation\fR to
feed data into the string. The \fBread operation\fR may indicate end of
input, in which case buffer_get returns 0; or a read error, in which
case buffer_get returns -1, setting \fIerrno\fR approporiately.
The preallocated space and the \fBread operation\fR are specified by
\fIb\fR. You must initialize \fBb\fR using buffer_init before calling
buffer_get (or use the pre-initialized buffer_0).
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_init(3), buffer_feed(3), buffer_peek(3), buffer_seek(3), buffer(3)

27
buffer/buffer_get_token.3

@ -0,0 +1,27 @@
.TH buffer_get_token 3
.SH NAME
buffer_get_token \- read token from buffer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_get_token\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR,char* \fIx\fR,unsigned int \fIlen\fR,
const char* \fIcharset\fR,unsigned int \fIsetlen\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
Normally buffer_get_token copies data to \fIx\fR[0], \fIx\fR[1], ...,
\fIx\fR[\fIlen\fR-1] from the beginning of a string stored in
preallocated space; removes these \fIlen\fR bytes from the string; and
returns \fIlen\fR.
If, however, the string has fewer than \fIlen\fR (but more than 0)
bytes, buffer_get_token copies only that many bytes, and returns that number.
If the string is empty, buffer_get_token first uses a \fBread operation\fR to
feed data into the string. The \fBread operation\fR may indicate end of
input, in which case buffer_get_token returns 0; or a read error, in which
case buffer_get_token returns -1, setting \fIerrno\fR approporiately.
The preallocated space and the \fBread operation\fR are specified by
\fIb\fR. You must initialize \fBb\fR using buffer_init before calling
buffer_get_token (or use the pre-initialized buffer_0).
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_init(3), buffer_feed(3), buffer_peek(3), buffer_seek(3), buffer(3)

11
buffer/buffer_getc.3

@ -0,0 +1,11 @@
.TH buffer_getc 3
.SH NAME
buffer_getc \- read one char from buffer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_getc\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR,char* \fIx\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_getc(b,x) is similar to buffer_get(b,x,1).
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_init(3), buffer_get(3), buffer(3)

22
buffer/buffer_getn.3

@ -0,0 +1,22 @@
.TH buffer_getn 3
.SH NAME
buffer_getn \- read binary data from buffer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_getn\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR,char* \fIx\fR,unsigned int \fIlen\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_getn copies data to \fIx\fR[0], \fIx\fR[1], ...,
\fIx\fR[\fIlen\fR-1] from the buffer, calling buffer_feed as needed, and
returns \fIlen\fR.
If a read error occurs, buffer_getn returns -1 and sets \fIerrno\fR
appropriately. It may then have put any number between 0 and \fIlen\fR
in the buffer, you can't tell. That makes this function only useful if
you don't care when an error occurs. Use buffer_get otherwise.
If the read operation signals end-of-file before \fIlen\fR bytes were
read, buffer_getn returns the number of bytes read from the buffer
before end-of-file.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_init(3), buffer_get(3), buffer(3)

45
buffer/buffer_init.3

@ -0,0 +1,45 @@
.TH buffer_init 3
.SH NAME
buffer_init \- initialize buffer structure
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_init\fR(buffer &\fIb\fR,
int (*\fIop\fR)(int,char*,unsigned int),
int \fIfd\fR, char* \fIy\fR, unsigned int \fIylen\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_init prepares \fIb\fR to store a string in \fIy\fR[0], \fIy\fR[1], ...,
\fIy\fR[\fIylen\fR-1]. Initially the string is empty.
buffer_init also prepares \fIb\fR to use the read/write operation specified by
\fIop\fR and \fIfd\fR.
You can use
buffer \fIb\fR = BUFFER_INIT(\fIop\fR,\fIfd\fR,\fIy\fR,\fIylen\fR);
to initialize \fIb\fR statically if \fIop\fR, \fIfd\fR, \fIy\fR, and \fIylen\fR
are compile-time constants.
You can call buffer_init again at any time. Note that this discards the
currently buffered string.
.SH EXAMPLE
#include <buffer.h>
#include <open.h>
char buf[4096];
int fd=open_read("/etc/services");
buffer input;
if (fd>=0) {
char x;
buffer_init(&input,read,fd,buf,sizeof buf);
while (buffer_get(&input,&x,1)==1) {
buffer_put(buffer_1,&x,1);
if (x=='\\n') break;
}
buffer_flush(buffer_1);
}
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_flush(3), buffer(3)

23
buffer/buffer_peek.3

@ -0,0 +1,23 @@
.TH buffer_peek 3
.SH NAME
buffer_peek \- return pointer to string in buffer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_peek\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_peek returns a pointer to the first byte of the string in the
buffer.
.SH EXAMPLE
buffer_feed, buffer_peek and buffer_seek can be used for efficient reading
loops, nearly the same speed as calling \fBop\fR directly:
for (;;) {
r = buffer_feed(&b);
if (r <= 0) return r;
x = buffer_peek(&b);
dosomething(x,r);
buffer_seek(&b,r);
}
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_init(3), buffer_feed(3), buffer_get(3), buffer_seek(3), buffer(3)

19
buffer/buffer_put.3

@ -0,0 +1,19 @@
.TH buffer_put 3
.SH NAME
buffer_put \- write binary data to buffer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_put\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR,const char* \fIx\fR,unsigned int \fIlen\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_put writes \fIlen\fR bytes from \fIx\fR to \fIb\fR.
The difference to buffer_putalign is that, when there isn't enough space
for new data, buffer_put calls buffer_flush before copying any data,
while buffer_putalign fills all available space with data before calling
buffer_flush.
On success, buffer_put returns 0. On error, buffer_put returns -1,
setting \fIerrno\fR appropriately.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_putalign(3), buffer_puts(3), buffer_flush(3), buffer(3)

13
buffer/buffer_put8long.3

@ -0,0 +1,13 @@
.TH buffer_put8long 3
.SH NAME
buffer_put8long \- write an octal ASCII representation of an unsigned
long integer to buffer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_put8long\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR,unsigned long \fIx\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_put8long is similar to passing the result of fmt_8long to
buffer_put.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
fmt_8long(3), buffer_put(3), buffer_flush(3), buffer(3)

16
buffer/buffer_putalign.3

@ -0,0 +1,16 @@
.TH buffer_putalign 3
.SH NAME
buffer_putalign \- write binary data to buffer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_putalign\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR,const char* \fIx\fR,unsigned int \fIlen\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_putalign is similar to buffer_put.
The difference to buffer_put is that, when there isn't enough space for
new data, buffer_put calls buffer_flush before copying any data, while
buffer_putalign fills all available space with data before calling
buffer_flush.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_put(3), buffer_putsalign(3), buffer_flush(3), buffer(3)

13
buffer/buffer_putflush.3

@ -0,0 +1,13 @@
.TH buffer_putflush 3
.SH NAME
buffer_putflush \- write binary data to buffer and flush
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_putflush\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR,
const char* \fIx\fR,unsigned int \fIlen\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_putflush is similar to calling
buffer_put(\fIb\fR,\fIx\fR,\fIlen\fR) and then buffer_flush(\fIb\fR).
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_put(3), buffer_flush(3), buffer(3)

13
buffer/buffer_putlong.3

@ -0,0 +1,13 @@
.TH buffer_putlong 3
.SH NAME
buffer_putlong \- write a decimal ASCII representation of a signed
long integer to buffer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_putlong\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR,unsigned long \fIx\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_putlong is similar to passing the result of fmt_long to
buffer_put.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
fmt_long(3), buffer_put(3), buffer_flush(3), buffer(3)

12
buffer/buffer_putnlflush.3

@ -0,0 +1,12 @@
.TH buffer_putnlflush 3
.SH NAME
buffer_putnlflush \- write '\\n' to buffer and flush
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_putnlflush\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_putnlflush writes a single ASCII new-line character ('\\n') to
\fIb\fR and calls buffer_flush(\fIb\fR).
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_puts(3), buffer_put(3), buffer_flush(3), buffer(3)

17
buffer/buffer_puts.3

@ -0,0 +1,17 @@
.TH buffer_puts 3
.SH NAME
buffer_puts \- write ASCIIZ string to buffer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_puts\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR,const char* \fIx\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_puts is like buffer_put with \fIlen\fR determined as the number
of bytes before the first \\0 in \fIx\fR.
The difference to buffer_putsalign is that, when there isn't enough space
for new data, buffer_puts calls buffer_flush before copying any data,
while buffer_putsalign fills all available space with data before calling
buffer_flush.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_putsalign(3), buffer_put(3), buffer_flush(3), buffer(3)

12
buffer/buffer_putsalign.3

@ -0,0 +1,12 @@
.TH buffer_putsalign 3
.SH NAME
buffer_putsalign \- write ASCIIZ string to buffer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_putsalign\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR,const char* \fIx\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_putsalign is like buffer_putalign with \fIlen\fR determined as
the number of bytes before the first \\0 in \fIx\fR.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_puts(3), buffer_put(3), buffer_flush(3), buffer(3)

12
buffer/buffer_putsflush.3

@ -0,0 +1,12 @@
.TH buffer_putsflush 3
.SH NAME
buffer_putsflush \- write ASCIIZ string to buffer and flush
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_putsflush\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR,const char* \fIx\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_putsflush is like buffer_putflush with \fIlen\fR determined as
the number of bytes before the first \\0 in \fIx\fR.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_put(3), buffer_flush(3), buffer(3)

11
buffer/buffer_putspace.3

@ -0,0 +1,11 @@
.TH buffer_putspace 3
.SH NAME
buffer_putspace \- write ASCII space to buffer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_putspace\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_putspace writes a single ASCII space character to \fIb\fR.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_puts(3), buffer_put(3), buffer_flush(3), buffer(3)

13
buffer/buffer_putulong.3

@ -0,0 +1,13 @@
.TH buffer_putulong 3
.SH NAME
buffer_putulong \- write a decimal ASCII representation of an unsigned
long integer to buffer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_putulong\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR,unsigned long \fIx\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_putulong is similar to passing the result of fmt_ulong to
buffer_put.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
fmt_ulong(3), buffer_put(3), buffer_flush(3), buffer(3)

13
buffer/buffer_putxlong.3

@ -0,0 +1,13 @@
.TH buffer_putxlong 3
.SH NAME
buffer_putxlong \- write a hexidecimal ASCII representation of an unsigned
long integer to buffer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_putxlong\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR,unsigned long \fIx\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_putxlong is similar to passing the result of fmt_xlong to
buffer_put.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
fmt_xlong(3), buffer_put(3), buffer_flush(3), buffer(3)

12
buffer/buffer_seek.3

@ -0,0 +1,12 @@
.TH buffer_seek 3
.SH NAME
buffer_seek \- remove bytes from beginning of string in buffer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <buffer.h>
int \fBbuffer_seek\fP(buffer* \fIb\fR,unsigned int \fIr\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
buffer_seek removes \fIr\fR bytes from the beginning of the string.
\fIr\fR must be at most the current length of the string.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
buffer_init(3), buffer_feed(3), buffer_peek(3), buffer_get(3), buffer(3)

7
buffer/buffer_seek.c

@ -0,0 +1,7 @@
#include "buffer.h"
void buffer_seek(buffer* b,unsigned int len) {
unsigned int n=b->p+len;
if (n>b->n) n=b->n;
b->p=n;
}

3
fmt/fmt_strn.3

@ -4,7 +4,8 @@ fmt_strn \- write an ASCII string
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <fmt.h>
unsigned int \fBfmt_strn\fP(char *\fIdest\fR,const char *\fIsource\fR,unsigned int maxlen);
unsigned int \fBfmt_strn\fP(char *\fIdest\fR,const char *\fIsource\fR,
unsigned int maxlen);
.SH DESCRIPTION
fmt_str copies at most \fImaxlen\fR leading nonzero bytes from
\fIsource\fR to \fIdest\fR and returns the number of bytes it copied.

3
fmt/fmt_uint0.3

@ -4,7 +4,8 @@ fmt_uint0 \- write a zero-padded ASCII representation of an unsigned integer
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <fmt.h>
unsigned int \fBfmt_uint0\fP(char *\fIdest\fR, unsigned int \fIsource\fR, unsigned int \fIn\fR);
unsigned int \fBfmt_uint0\fP(char *\fIdest\fR,unsigned int \fIsource\fR,
unsigned int \fIn\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
fmt_uint0 writes an ASCII representation ('0' to '9', base 10) of
\fIsource\fR to \fIdest\fR and returns the number of bytes written.

3
fmt/fmt_ulong0.3

@ -4,7 +4,8 @@ fmt_ulong0 \- write a zero-padded ASCII representation of an unsigned long integ
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <fmt.h>
unsigned int \fBfmt_uint0\fP(char *\fIdest\fR, unsigned long \fIsource\fR, unsigned int \fIn\fR);
unsigned int \fBfmt_ulong0\fP(char *\fIdest\fR, unsigned long \fIsource\fR,
unsigned int \fIn\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
fmt_ulong0 writes an ASCII representation ('0' to '9', base 10) of
\fIsource\fR to \fIdest\fR and returns the number of bytes written.

13
scan/scan_8short.3

@ -0,0 +1,13 @@
.TH scan_8short 3
.SH NAME
scan_8short \- parse an unsigned short integer in octal ASCII representation
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <scan.h>
int \fBscan_8short\fP(const char *\fIsrc\fR,unsigned short *\fIdest\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
scan_8short parses an unsigned short integer in octal ASCII representation
from \fIsrc\fR and writes the result into \fIdest\fR. It returns the
number of bytes read from \fIsrc\fR.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
scan_xshort(3)

13
scan/scan_ushort.3

@ -0,0 +1,13 @@
.TH scan_ushort 3
.SH NAME
scan_ushort \- parse an unsigned short integer in decimal ASCII representation
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <scan.h>
int \fBscan_ushort\fP(const char *\fIsrc\fR,unsigned short *\fIdest\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
scan_ushort parses an unsigned short integer in decimal ASCII representation
from \fIsrc\fR and writes the result into \fIdest\fR. It returns the
number of bytes read from \fIsrc\fR.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
scan_xshort(3), scan_8short(3), fmt_ulong(3)

17
scan/scan_xshort.3

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.TH scan_xshort 3
.SH NAME
scan_xshort \- parse an unsigned short integer in hexadecimal ASCII representation
.SH SYNTAX
.B #include <scan.h>
int \fBscan_xshort\fP(const char *\fIsrc\fR,unsigned short *\fIdest\fR);
.SH DESCRIPTION
scan_xshort parses an unsigned short integer in hexadecimal ASCII
representation from \fIsrc\fR and writes the result into \fIdest\fR. It
returns the number of bytes read from \fIsrc\fR.
scan_xshort understands both upper and lower case letters.
scan_xshort does not expect or understand a "0x" prefix.
.SH "SEE ALSO"
fmt_xshort(3)
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