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This commit is contained in:
Marc Alexander Lehmann 2009-04-25 14:23:26 +00:00
parent 3035ff96e0
commit ffb92e15e8
1 changed files with 15 additions and 14 deletions

29
ev.pod
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@ -3937,6 +3937,9 @@ way (note also that glib is the slowest event library known to man).
There is no supported compilation method available on windows except
embedding it into other applications.
Sensible signal handling is officially unsupported by Microsoft - libev
tries its best, but under most conditions, signals will simply not work.
Not a libev limitation but worth mentioning: windows apparently doesn't
accept large writes: instead of resulting in a partial write, windows will
either accept everything or return C<ENOBUFS> if the buffer is too large,
@ -3950,7 +3953,7 @@ is not recommended (and not reasonable). If your program needs to use
more than a hundred or so sockets, then likely it needs to use a totally
different implementation for windows, as libev offers the POSIX readiness
notification model, which cannot be implemented efficiently on windows
(Microsoft monopoly games).
(due to Microsoft monopoly games).
A typical way to use libev under windows is to embed it (see the embedding
section for details) and use the following F<evwrap.h> header file instead
@ -3996,24 +3999,22 @@ Early versions of winsocket's select only supported waiting for a maximum
of C<64> handles (probably owning to the fact that all windows kernels
can only wait for C<64> things at the same time internally; Microsoft
recommends spawning a chain of threads and wait for 63 handles and the
previous thread in each. Great).
previous thread in each. Sounds great!).
Newer versions support more handles, but you need to define C<FD_SETSIZE>
to some high number (e.g. C<2048>) before compiling the winsocket select
call (which might be in libev or elsewhere, for example, perl does its own
select emulation on windows).
call (which might be in libev or elsewhere, for example, perl and many
other interpreters do their own select emulation on windows).
Another limit is the number of file descriptors in the Microsoft runtime
libraries, which by default is C<64> (there must be a hidden I<64> fetish
or something like this inside Microsoft). You can increase this by calling
C<_setmaxstdio>, which can increase this limit to C<2048> (another
arbitrary limit), but is broken in many versions of the Microsoft runtime
libraries.
This might get you to about C<512> or C<2048> sockets (depending on
windows version and/or the phase of the moon). To get more, you need to
wrap all I/O functions and provide your own fd management, but the cost of
calling select (O(n²)) will likely make this unworkable.
libraries, which by default is C<64> (there must be a hidden I<64>
fetish or something like this inside Microsoft). You can increase this
by calling C<_setmaxstdio>, which can increase this limit to C<2048>
(another arbitrary limit), but is broken in many versions of the Microsoft
runtime libraries. This might get you to about C<512> or C<2048> sockets
(depending on windows version and/or the phase of the moon). To get more,
you need to wrap all I/O functions and provide your own fd management, but
the cost of calling select (O(n²)) will likely make this unworkable.
=back