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Marc Alexander Lehmann 14 years ago
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  1. 66
      ev.pod

66
ev.pod

@ -65,7 +65,7 @@ C<ev_version_minor>. If you want, you can compare against the global
symbols C<EV_VERSION_MAJOR> and C<EV_VERSION_MINOR>, which specify the
version of the library your program was compiled against.
Usually, its a good idea to terminate if the major versions mismatch,
Usually, it's a good idea to terminate if the major versions mismatch,
as this indicates an incompatible change. Minor versions are usually
compatible to older versions, so a larger minor version alone is usually
not a problem.
@ -105,7 +105,7 @@ in your main thread (or in a separate thrad) and for each thread you
create, you also create another event loop. Libev itself does no locking
whatsoever, so if you mix calls to the same event loop in different
threads, make sure you lock (this is usually a bad idea, though, even if
done correctly, because its hideous and inefficient).
done correctly, because it's hideous and inefficient).
=over 4
@ -128,7 +128,7 @@ It supports the following flags:
=item EVFLAG_AUTO
The default flags value. Use this if you have no clue (its the right
The default flags value. Use this if you have no clue (it's the right
thing, believe me).
=item EVFLAG_NOENV
@ -140,17 +140,17 @@ override the flags completely if it is found in the environment. This is
useful to try out specific backends to test their performance, or to work
around bugs.
=item EVMETHOD_SELECT portable select backend
=item EVMETHOD_SELECT (portable select backend)
=item EVMETHOD_POLL poll backend (everywhere except windows)
=item EVMETHOD_POLL (poll backend, available everywhere except on windows)
=item EVMETHOD_EPOLL linux only
=item EVMETHOD_EPOLL (linux only)
=item EVMETHOD_KQUEUE some bsds only
=item EVMETHOD_KQUEUE (some bsds only)
=item EVMETHOD_DEVPOLL solaris 8 only
=item EVMETHOD_DEVPOLL (solaris 8 only)
=item EVMETHOD_PORT solaris 10 only
=item EVMETHOD_PORT (solaris 10 only)
If one or more of these are ored into the flags value, then only these
backends will be tried (in the reverse order as given here). If one are
@ -169,7 +169,7 @@ undefined behaviour (or a failed assertion if assertions are enabled).
Destroys the default loop again (frees all memory and kernel state
etc.). This stops all registered event watchers (by not touching them in
any way whatsoever, although you cnanot rely on this :).
any way whatsoever, although you cannot rely on this :).
=item ev_loop_destroy (loop)
@ -187,7 +187,7 @@ You I<must> call this function after forking if and only if you want to
use the event library in both processes. If you just fork+exec, you don't
have to call it.
The function itself is quite fast and its usually not a problem to call
The function itself is quite fast and it's usually not a problem to call
it just in case after a fork. To make this easy, the function will fit in
quite nicely into a call to C<pthread_atfork>:
@ -204,7 +204,7 @@ after fork, and how you do this is entirely your own problem.
Returns one of the C<EVMETHOD_*> flags indicating the event backend in
use.
=item ev_tstamp = ev_now (loop)
=item ev_tstamp ev_now (loop)
Returns the current "event loop time", which is the time the event loop
got events and started processing them. This timestamp does not change
@ -223,11 +223,12 @@ no event watchers are active anymore or C<ev_unloop> was called.
A flags value of C<EVLOOP_NONBLOCK> will look for new events, will handle
those events and any outstanding ones, but will not block your process in
case there are no events.
case there are no events and will return after one iteration of the loop.
A flags value of C<EVLOOP_ONESHOT> will look for new events (waiting if
neccessary) and will handle those and any outstanding ones. It will block
your process until at least one new event arrives.
your process until at least one new event arrives, and will return after
one iteration of the loop.
This flags value could be used to implement alternative looping
constructs, but the C<prepare> and C<check> watchers provide a better and
@ -235,24 +236,25 @@ more generic mechanism.
=item ev_unloop (loop, how)
Can be used to make a call to C<ev_loop> return early. The C<how> argument
must be either C<EVUNLOOP_ONCE>, which will make the innermost C<ev_loop>
call return, or C<EVUNLOOP_ALL>, which will make all nested C<ev_loop>
calls return.
Can be used to make a call to C<ev_loop> return early (but only after it
has processed all outstanding events). The C<how> argument must be either
C<EVUNLOOP_ONCE>, which will make the innermost C<ev_loop> call return, or
C<EVUNLOOP_ALL>, which will make all nested C<ev_loop> calls return.
=item ev_ref (loop)
=item ev_unref (loop)
Ref/unref can be used to add or remove a refcount on the event loop: Every
watcher keeps one reference. If you have a long-runing watcher you never
unregister that should not keep ev_loop from running, ev_unref() after
starting, and ev_ref() before stopping it. Libev itself uses this for
example for its internal signal pipe: It is not visible to you as a user
and should not keep C<ev_loop> from exiting if the work is done. It is
also an excellent way to do this for generic recurring timers or from
within third-party libraries. Just remember to unref after start and ref
before stop.
Ref/unref can be used to add or remove a reference count on the event
loop: Every watcher keeps one reference, and as long as the reference
count is nonzero, C<ev_loop> will not return on its own. If you have
a watcher you never unregister that should not keep C<ev_loop> from
returning, ev_unref() after starting, and ev_ref() before stopping it. For
example, libev itself uses this for its internal signal pipe: It is not
visible to the libev user and should not keep C<ev_loop> from exiting if
no event watchers registered by it are active. It is also an excellent
way to do this for generic recurring timers or from within third-party
libraries. Just remember to I<unref after start> and I<ref before stop>.
=back
@ -449,6 +451,14 @@ time, it will still time out after (roughly) and hour. "Roughly" because
detecting time jumps is hard, and soem inaccuracies are unavoidable (the
monotonic clock option helps a lot here).
The relative timeouts are calculated relative to the C<ev_now ()>
time. This is usually the right thing as this timestamp refers to the time
of the event triggering whatever timeout you are modifying/starting. If
you suspect event processing to be delayed and you *need* to base the timeout
ion the current time, use something like this to adjust for this:
ev_timer_set (&timer, after + ev_now () - ev_time (), 0.);
=over 4
=item ev_timer_init (ev_timer *, callback, ev_tstamp after, ev_tstamp repeat)
@ -587,7 +597,7 @@ program when the crontabs have changed).
Signal watchers will trigger an event when the process receives a specific
signal one or more times. Even though signals are very asynchronous, libev
will try its best to deliver signals synchronously, i.e. as part of the
will try it's best to deliver signals synchronously, i.e. as part of the
normal event processing, like any other event.
You cna configure as many watchers as you like per signal. Only when the

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