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Marc Alexander Lehmann 10 years ago
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      ev.pod

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ev.pod

@ -84,9 +84,9 @@ throughout this document.
This manual tries to be very detailed, but unfortunately, this also makes
it very long. If you just want to know the basics of libev, I suggest
reading L<ANATOMY OF A WATCHER>, then the L<EXAMPLE PROGRAM> above and
look up the missing functions in L<GLOBAL FUNCTIONS> and the C<ev_io> and
C<ev_timer> sections in L<WATCHER TYPES>.
reading L</ANATOMY OF A WATCHER>, then the L<E/XAMPLE PROGRAM> above and
look up the missing functions in L</GLOBAL FUNCTIONS> and the C<ev_io> and
C<ev_timer> sections in L</WATCHER TYPES>.
=head1 ABOUT LIBEV
@ -766,7 +766,7 @@ This function is rarely useful, but when some event callback runs for a
very long time without entering the event loop, updating libev's idea of
the current time is a good idea.
See also L<The special problem of time updates> in the C<ev_timer> section.
See also L</The special problem of time updates> in the C<ev_timer> section.
=item ev_suspend (loop)
@ -1348,7 +1348,7 @@ or might not have been clamped to the valid range.
The default priority used by watchers when no priority has been set is
always C<0>, which is supposed to not be too high and not be too low :).
See L<WATCHER PRIORITY MODELS>, below, for a more thorough treatment of
See L</WATCHER PRIORITY MODELS>, below, for a more thorough treatment of
priorities.
=item ev_invoke (loop, ev_TYPE *watcher, int revents)
@ -1383,7 +1383,7 @@ functions that do not need a watcher.
=back
See also the L<ASSOCIATING CUSTOM DATA WITH A WATCHER> and L<BUILDING YOUR
See also the L</ASSOCIATING CUSTOM DATA WITH A WATCHER> and L</BUILDING YOUR
OWN COMPOSITE WATCHERS> idioms.
=head2 WATCHER STATES
@ -2138,7 +2138,7 @@ and start the timer, if necessary.
=back
This sounds a bit complicated, see L<Be smart about timeouts>, above, for a
This sounds a bit complicated, see L</Be smart about timeouts>, above, for a
usage example.
=item ev_tstamp ev_timer_remaining (loop, ev_timer *)
@ -2860,7 +2860,7 @@ This mode of operation can be useful together with an C<ev_check> watcher,
to do something on each event loop iteration - for example to balance load
between different connections.
See L<< Abusing an C<ev_check> watcher for its side-effect >> for a longer
See L<< /Abusing an C<ev_check> watcher for its side-effect >> for a longer
example.
=head3 Watcher-Specific Functions and Data Members
@ -3890,7 +3890,7 @@ instead of storing a coroutine, you store the queue object and instead of
switching to a coroutine, you push the watcher onto the queue and notify
any waiters.
To embed libev, see L<EMBEDDING>, but in short, it's easiest to create two
To embed libev, see L</EMBEDDING>, but in short, it's easiest to create two
files, F<my_ev.h> and F<my_ev.c> that include the respective libev files:
// my_ev.h
@ -4995,7 +4995,7 @@ watcher callback into the event loop interested in the signal.
=back
See also L<THREAD LOCKING EXAMPLE>.
See also L</THREAD LOCKING EXAMPLE>.
=head3 COROUTINES
@ -5411,7 +5411,7 @@ new API early than late.
=item C<EV_COMPAT3> backwards compatibility mechanism
The backward compatibility mechanism can be controlled by
C<EV_COMPAT3>. See L<PREPROCESSOR SYMBOLS/MACROS> in the L<EMBEDDING>
C<EV_COMPAT3>. See L</PREPROCESSOR SYMBOLS/MACROS> in the L</EMBEDDING>
section.
=item C<ev_default_destroy> and C<ev_default_fork> have been removed
@ -5464,7 +5464,7 @@ and work, but the library code will of course be larger.
=item active
A watcher is active as long as it has been started and not yet stopped.
See L<WATCHER STATES> for details.
See L</WATCHER STATES> for details.
=item application
@ -5510,7 +5510,7 @@ watchers and events.
=item pending
A watcher is pending as soon as the corresponding event has been
detected. See L<WATCHER STATES> for details.
detected. See L</WATCHER STATES> for details.
=item real time

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