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Fix typos.

master
Emanuele Giaquinta 11 years ago
parent
commit
08d766f013
  1. 18
      ev.pod
  2. 2
      ev_epoll.c
  3. 2
      ev_kqueue.c
  4. 4
      ev_port.c
  5. 2
      ev_select.c

18
ev.pod

@ -77,7 +77,7 @@ libev, its usage and the rationale behind its design, it is not a tutorial
on event-based programming, nor will it introduce event-based programming
with libev.
Familarity with event based programming techniques in general is assumed
Familiarity with event based programming techniques in general is assumed
throughout this document.
=head1 ABOUT LIBEV
@ -707,7 +707,7 @@ C<ev_resume> directly afterwards to resume timer processing.
Effectively, all C<ev_timer> watchers will be delayed by the time spend
between C<ev_suspend> and C<ev_resume>, and all C<ev_periodic> watchers
will be rescheduled (that is, they will lose any events that would have
occured while suspended).
occurred while suspended).
After calling C<ev_suspend> you B<must not> call I<any> function on the
given loop other than C<ev_resume>, and you B<must not> call C<ev_resume>
@ -794,7 +794,7 @@ C<EVUNLOOP_ALL>, which will make all nested C<ev_loop> calls return.
This "unloop state" will be cleared when entering C<ev_loop> again.
It is safe to call C<ev_unloop> from otuside any C<ev_loop> calls.
It is safe to call C<ev_unloop> from outside any C<ev_loop> calls.
=item ev_ref (loop)
@ -874,7 +874,7 @@ as this approaches the timing granularity of most systems. Note that if
you do transactions with the outside world and you can't increase the
parallelity, then this setting will limit your transaction rate (if you
need to poll once per transaction and the I/O collect interval is 0.01,
then you can't do more than 100 transations per second).
then you can't do more than 100 transactions per second).
Setting the I<timeout collect interval> can improve the opportunity for
saving power, as the program will "bundle" timer callback invocations that
@ -1382,7 +1382,7 @@ For example, to emulate how many other event libraries handle priorities,
you can associate an C<ev_idle> watcher to each such watcher, and in
the normal watcher callback, you just start the idle watcher. The real
processing is done in the idle watcher callback. This causes libev to
continously poll and process kernel event data for the watcher, but when
continuously poll and process kernel event data for the watcher, but when
the lock-out case is known to be rare (which in turn is rare :), this is
workable.
@ -1470,7 +1470,7 @@ If you cannot use non-blocking mode, then force the use of a
known-to-be-good backend (at the time of this writing, this includes only
C<EVBACKEND_SELECT> and C<EVBACKEND_POLL>). The same applies to file
descriptors for which non-blocking operation makes no sense (such as
files) - libev doesn't guarentee any specific behaviour in that case.
files) - libev doesn't guarantee any specific behaviour in that case.
Another thing you have to watch out for is that it is quite easy to
receive "spurious" readiness notifications, that is your callback might
@ -1739,7 +1739,7 @@ within the callback:
// if last_activity + 60. is older than now, we did time out
if (timeout < now)
{
// timeout occured, take action
// timeout occurred, take action
}
else
{
@ -3988,7 +3988,7 @@ The highest supported signal number, +1 (or, the number of
signals): Normally, libev tries to deduce the maximum number of signals
automatically, but sometimes this fails, in which case it can be
specified. Also, using a lower number than detected (C<32> should be
good for about any system in existance) can save some memory, as libev
good for about any system in existence) can save some memory, as libev
statically allocates some 12-24 bytes per signal number.
=item EV_PID_HASHSIZE
@ -4653,7 +4653,7 @@ This is a simple rename - all other watcher types use their name
as revents flag, and now C<ev_timer> does, too.
Both C<EV_TIMER> and C<EV_TIMEOUT> symbols were present in 3.x versions
and continue to be present for the forseeable future, so this is mostly a
and continue to be present for the foreseeable future, so this is mostly a
documentation change.
=item C<EV_MINIMAL> mechanism replaced by C<EV_FEATURES>

2
ev_epoll.c

@ -170,7 +170,7 @@ epoll_poll (EV_P_ ev_tstamp timeout)
/* which is fortunately easy to do for us. */
if (epoll_ctl (backend_fd, want ? EPOLL_CTL_MOD : EPOLL_CTL_DEL, fd, ev))
{
postfork = 1; /* an error occured, recreate kernel state */
postfork = 1; /* an error occurred, recreate kernel state */
continue;
}
}

2
ev_kqueue.c

@ -156,7 +156,7 @@ kqueue_poll (EV_P_ ev_tstamp timeout)
int inline_size
kqueue_init (EV_P_ int flags)
{
/* Initalize the kernel queue */
/* Initialize the kernel queue */
if ((backend_fd = kqueue ()) < 0)
return 0;

4
ev_port.c

@ -127,7 +127,7 @@ port_poll (EV_P_ ev_tstamp timeout)
int inline_size
port_init (EV_P_ int flags)
{
/* Initalize the kernel queue */
/* Initialize the kernel queue */
if ((backend_fd = port_create ()) < 0)
return 0;
@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ port_init (EV_P_ int flags)
backend_modify = port_modify;
backend_poll = port_poll;
port_eventmax = 64; /* intiial number of events receivable per poll */
port_eventmax = 64; /* initial number of events receivable per poll */
port_events = (port_event_t *)ev_malloc (sizeof (port_event_t) * port_eventmax);
return EVBACKEND_PORT;

2
ev_select.c

@ -184,7 +184,7 @@ select_poll (EV_P_ ev_tstamp timeout)
#endif
#ifdef _WIN32
/* select on windows errornously returns EINVAL when no fd sets have been
/* select on windows erroneously returns EINVAL when no fd sets have been
* provided (this is documented). what microsoft doesn't tell you that this bug
* exists even when the fd sets _are_ provided, so we have to check for this bug
* here and emulate by sleeping manually.

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